?

Log in

The truth is I'm not sorry - it's bigger than the both of us  
11:57am 30/12/2009
 
 
Wronger Than Ten Hitlers
I've not written here for ages. Damn only having work internet, and everyone wanting to advertise prior to Christmas. The ninnies. So, apologies for the poor writing below, I'm a bit rusty, and like my cupcakes, the words are coming out a bit lumpy when mixed together.

**************

I'm making a compilation CD - well, mp3 folder, the modern age and all that - for my youngest nephew. The older ones listen to bad donk music, whilst he is learning guitar, has grown his hair, wears waistcoats and a Crombie and likes The White Stripes, The Raconteurs, Gorillaz, Coldplay and Keane (quiet now: I liked Shed bleedin' Seven at his age). I didn't have a cool older relative to get me into music beyond the charts, and it would be pretty good to do this, I reckon. I feel sorry for him not having John Peel - in a place where everyone listened to Northern House or boybands, record shopping had to be done in the bustling metropolis of Preston, and you were lucky to get the NME before the copy sold out, it was great to have cultural arbiters. Of course, there's music blogs now, which is great for me and unimaginable to my fourteen-year old self. But it's getting exposed to things, even if you hate them, that's necessary. I used to devour the music press - '80s back copies of NME were much prized - and books about new wave to see what I'd missed out on, and at the risk of sounding ancient, NME ceased to be relevant for me once they stopped reviewing HMHB and Hefner and started asking people what their favourite ringtones were, sponsored by Shockwave.

I felt quietly proud when, in countenance to my sister's 'Why did they choose this Machine to be Number 1? What a CRAP song', he replied 'It's good! It's about racism.' I remember being made to feel weird because I didn't listen to Rock FM, had records as well as CDs, worked in a record exchange that didn't have copies of Rock The Dancefloor in it. It wasn't fun, although part of me revelled in it. Rebellion could be achieved by actually loving music, instead of liking it a bit.

The trouble is, at that age I was also very rockist - I didn't know dance music I liked was out there until I was in my late teens, thinking it was all like the stuff played in the fornication sheds in the precinct carpark where my friend got 'licked out' once at 3am. All hip-hop closed my ears, as I automatically thought it would be boring 'sexy music' rather than the interesting or insightful stuff that lurked just beyond The Chart Show's R+B chart - and while I adored Elvis Costello, I didn't 'get' Prince or Springsteen until my mid-twenties. I got records from the library (took out The Bends at 13, didn't get it, but loved it two years later) or taped from the radio; it took a couple of years for me to start appreciating unusual structures and styles. Is a 14yr old Raconteurs fan going to like Mogwai? Belle and Sebastian? Majik Most? Laura Cantrell? Possibly not. I didn't 'get' The Smiths until I was at least 15 - you need to have had a good dose of teen angst not to think that Morrissey is a moaning minnie, and like reading The Catcher in The Rye, do it too late and you feel it's passed you by already. And I'd love to stick some Easy Star All-Stars on there - the Toots and the Maytals version of Let Down is bizarrely life-affirming given the source material - but what of reggae? I forget that not everyone had Madness to grow up on before dipping toes into ska, dub and bluebeat.

My tastes of late have got somewhat esoteric - my favourite band are probably still The Fall, my favourite albums are probably still The Italian Flag, Tel Aviv, Rattlesnakes, Steve McQueen etc. etc. and so on, but since I got ill a couple of years ago I've found listening to music hard and veer between midwestern indie-rock and outsider music. Plus, there's a fifteen year age gap - I want to stick in the songs that made me feel understood, allied with, a little bit bigger, but is someone born in 1995 going to appreciate 'What's on the box?/Man About The House with Paula Wilcox' or just think it's a bit crap really?

I need suggestions. And if there's anything I might have missed myself this year and need in my life, then let me know too.
 
    Post - Read 11 - Share - Link
 

(no subject)
 wardytron
 
12:21pm 30/12/2009 (UTC)
 
 
wardytron
Is Killing In The Name about racism? If anything, that makes it even worse. I just thought it was a dreadful shouting din. Now it's a dreadful shouting din about racism. Bring back Bing, I say. Or anyone. Silence would be good.

Anyway, re. reggae, "Liquidator" by the Harry J All-Stars and "Return of Django" by the Upsetters are good, and everyone knows them without realising they know them.
 
    Reply - Thread - Link
 
(no subject)
 damnspynovels
 
01:36pm 30/12/2009 (UTC)
 
 
damnspynovels
Is it really that bad, in this post-Peel world? Yes, it was easy to get exposed to things in the 90s, good and bad; having an informed opinion on everything current, contemporary and relevant was as easy as turning on the radio at night.

But really, was Peel still around, I don't think he'd be as relevant to your average 14 yr old today as he might've been to me as a 14 yr old in the 80s, or you in the 90s. It's a different landscape. We can lament the days when NME mattered, and curse the garbage it is today. But like all these things, I'm sure the changes were necessary for people to keep their jobs. Who's to say if the NME was publishing the same kinds of thing it was 15 years ago that anyone would buy it?

As it is, I still insist that your average 14 yr old is better positioned than you or I ever was to discover what's out there.
 
    Reply - Thread - Link
 
(no subject)
 mippy
 
02:31pm 30/12/2009 (UTC)
 
 
Wronger Than Ten Hitlers
You're right, and I couldn't quite articulate this - I am jealous of the access kids have now to things we would have had to pay £15.99 at HMV to try out. I do wonder how kids happen upon things, though - by surfing around music blogs? Last.fm? Zane bleedin' Lowe?

I see your point about the NME, but I'm only 27 and I like guitar music, so it should have something I want to read in it. The NME of the 80s/early 90s felt relevant to me in the late 90s, even if the bands were not.
 
    Reply - Parent - Thread - Link
 
(no subject)
 damnspynovels
 
02:48pm 30/12/2009 (UTC)
 
 
damnspynovels
Word of mouth is pretty powerful and I can only imagine how big a part one form or another of electronic communication figures in a 14 year old's life these days. Can only speak for myself but i presume it to be like how in 1990, I'd go to school extolling the virtue of something I heard on Peel the night before, x infinity.

The other day, a pal of mine turned me onto some band called Freelance Whales (horrible name and passable music in an Arcade Fire meets Postal Service manner). Pitchfork has nothing on them right now, but Last FM is fairly ablaze considering their album is freely available on the tubes months ahead of its physical release in March next year. Do I know how he found them? No, but it doesn't matter really does it?
 
    Reply - Parent - Thread - Link
 
(no subject)
 wardytron
 
02:57pm 30/12/2009 (UTC)
 
 
wardytron
£15.99? Eep. In my day we only had to pay £3.99 to buy The Velvet Underground & Nico, then travel home on the bus, then put it on the record player, then listen to the blasted thing as many times as we could manage, before realising we didn't like it. Spotify would've been handy.
 
    Reply - Parent - Thread - Link
 
(no subject)
 ems
 
01:38pm 30/12/2009 (UTC)
 
 
ems
you need to have had a good dose of teen angst not to think that Morrissey is a moaning minnie, and like reading The Catcher in The Rye, do it too late and you feel it's passed you by already

SO VERY TRUE.
 
    Reply - Thread - Link
 
(no subject)
 helloalena
 
10:49pm 30/12/2009 (UTC)
 
 
It's about the Journey
agreed!
 
    Reply - Parent - Thread - Link
 
(no subject)
 literaryrose
 
03:09pm 30/12/2009 (UTC)
 
 
I agree - I had the biggest collection of NMES which I devoured every Wednesday, it was the highlight of my week. I wonder how different my tastes would have turned out if I had access to the internet and blogs. I relied on the weekly columns in NME and Melody Maker, and Smash Hits before that.

Re music suggestions, it's hard to know what to suggest but my favourite new bands are Marina and the Diamonds or Gabby Young and Other Animals, but whether he would like them? Probably not but it's fun recommending what you love. Everyone should have a chance to hear a band like The Smiths and decide if they like them or not. But then the bands I love the most (Smiths, Radiohead etc) are the ones I discovered myself with no pushing from others. There aren't many new bands out there that I can discover without sitting for hours on MySpace or having a chance to listen to XFM so I am a little out of it with new music.

By the way, your writing isn't clunky at all. I expect this reply is though...
picword: SheRa and Glimmer
 
    Reply - Thread - Link
 
(no subject)
 damnspynovels
 
03:49pm 30/12/2009 (UTC)
 
 
damnspynovels
Tell you what, so for the longest time (re. 1989 to about 1994 - so not that long) I kept each week's NME. For reference purposes. Because you could do that in those days. I mean if I'm honest, i never read them cover to cover. I probably should've. But whilst I'll recall the jokes the NME poked at Midway Still for having the worst logo in rock, I couldn't tell you anything about them.

But for a while at least, say when i got into Stereolab in early 1994, I'd make it a ritual to find out what the NME had written about them in the past. And you'd be guaranteed that someone would've been at their early Water Rat's gigs, along with the 30 or so other people that knew.

I bet whoever 2010's equivalent of Stereolab circa 1993 can't claim to be getting the same kind of mainstream press.

But like I said, it's been NME's decision to not cover that stuff. They must have their reasons. And more to the point, they weren't the best at it, even in the 90s. I mean, there was that whole double spread article I recall so fondly at the arse end of 1995. The one that was their report on the new sound of britain, name dropping anyone who was anyone releasing 7"s on bedroom labels up and down the country (so The Delgados, Lung Leg, Bob Tilton, Scarfo, The Yummy Fur etc etc).

Except wasn't it the appropriated result of a previous call out to their readership of "who's hot in your town?', with the promise of a byline and maybe more? Thieving pricks.
 
    Reply - Thread - Link
 
(no subject)
 maldeluxx
 
09:00pm 30/12/2009 (UTC)
 
 
Silver M
I was a Melody Maker reader *ducks missiles* But anyway, I had the luck of having a good radio when I was starting my music taste. I got into heaploads of stuff through it, including John Peel, who did stuff for that station up here :) Also raided the music library (books, CDs *and* vinyls), trying a lot of bands.
My parents' music taste was a good influence (they have a pretty wide and varied taste though smaller than mine), and buying My Bloody Valentine's "Loveless" IMHO made sure I could take weird stuff better later on. My friends did not influence at all cos I didn't have any really.
I still keep trying to push my taste into bigger horizons that I have missed... keeps me youngish XD
I have all my free cassettes, and taped cassettes still, in boxes (two). And I burn compilations out of tracks I like on free CDs... the radio no longer rocks which is a shame. :P

(now listening to Ed Kuepper's "The Man Who Sold The World" cover, breezy and good that way - free CDs with music magz is still a good thing)
 
    Reply - Thread - Link
 
(no subject)
 bri_himself
 
10:43pm 30/12/2009 (UTC)
 
 
The Once And Future Dink: Show Of Hands
Rebellion could be achieved by actually loving music, instead of liking it a bit.

Ha! Yes.
picword: Show Of Hands
 
    Reply - Thread - Link
 


 
 
 
Links  
  Colour Supplement
My shiny shiny website
The internet is just Teletext for poseurs.
<Twitter pun>
My favourite waste of time...
Buy a tee. Get me points. Hurrah!
Mum, can I have a rabbit?
Stuff Alan looks at inbetween playing TF2
Pretty pretty clothings
Commentary on the mags we love to hate
 
Navigation  
  Previous Entry
Next Entry
 
September 2010  
 
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930
 


  Powered by
LiveJournal.com